How to Film in Daylight | 4 Cinematic Looks

How to Film in Daylight | 4 Cinematic Looks

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EXT. LOS ANGELES – DAY

In the world of filmmaking, daylight can have many different creative and narrative meanings. While harsh daylight can imply a character’s struggle, softer “Hollywood” daylight can convey hope or change.

In today’s episode of Ask Aputure, Ted from the A-Team walks us through four different ways filmmakers and cinematographers film daylight exteriors to achieve a cinematic look that enhances a character and/or scene. Use one of these four cinematic techniques in your next film project to help enhance your narrative and character development.

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Summary:
Filmmaker Ted Sim teaches the four most common types of daylight looks using in Hollywood and independent films. Aputure’s YouTube channel provides free high quality cinematography, lighting, and filmmaking educational content to help you take your film projects to the next level.

#cinematography #exteriordaylight #filmingoutdoors

50 Comments

  1. The Jams on February 7, 2020 at 5:22 pm

    can you add translators in every video aputure?
    because I am very slow to digest the language
    Thanks before

  2. Youlist on February 7, 2020 at 5:23 pm

    All cap text is very hard to read

  3. Photography In A Click on February 7, 2020 at 5:23 pm

    When shooting inside with the daylight bursrting in use redheads with gels orange to conjure up both the mood and overall style of the scene that I need to convey the narrative to the audience. I like to have control over my scene. Thanks jF

  4. Aputure on February 7, 2020 at 5:26 pm

    What’s your favorite outdoor scene?

  5. Benjamin Harris on February 7, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    The cloud coverage softbox effect is by far my favorite. I find it to be more versatile while many of the other types have a strong emotion associated with them.

  6. MarkAndApps on February 7, 2020 at 5:31 pm

    Tom Antos!

  7. Musab Al Rawahi on February 7, 2020 at 5:33 pm

    brilliant

  8. Tornadoboy on February 7, 2020 at 5:34 pm

    Moonlight/night exteriors please?!

  9. smack daddy on February 7, 2020 at 5:35 pm

    Thankful I live in a world where an amazing lighting company takes time to make tutorials for growing artists! #thankyouaputure

  10. Post Kad on February 7, 2020 at 5:35 pm

    Please don´t drop the titles in the middle of the screen, so annoying when you are trying to see the examples you are providing.

  11. Lee Love on February 7, 2020 at 5:35 pm

    As usual Ted hit the best techniques that most of us use. It is all about control, light is light and learning to master it is the key to to both photography and video production. If possible the first thing to do is scrim the light so you have a lower contrast ratio. From there I will bring in my own lighting so I have precise control and working with the camera color temperature. But I prefer to change the color temperture in post because once again it gives me total control, especially in matching cameras and scenes.

  12. Meran Smileyy on February 7, 2020 at 5:36 pm

    0:52- LOW KEY??? If the difference (contrast ratio) between highlights and shadows is low it doesn’t mean that it is a Low Key Lighting. It’s actually a High Key scene.

  13. ANDRIAN FEMIXOBOY on February 7, 2020 at 5:37 pm

    The gray light I like it.

  14. Esteban Medellín on February 7, 2020 at 5:38 pm

    When shooting in daylight I think that, when cloudy, the face of the actor should be pointed so the "light source" is lighting his/her face so you don´t get a dark face when editing. Also, use the sun as back light at golden hour, (I haven´t done it yet…but I have heard it looks amazing). And also, I try to find interiors with windows, doors, or some type of structure that covers the excess of light so you can have a "daylight light source" from the side or some other angle (depending on how you find that place, like going under a bridge). And, with the same idea as the previous point, look for reflections and bounced light, in interiores and exteriors (some white wall at the street, even your clothes, if you have the camera and you are close to the actor and the sun if behind him/her, you can wear a white shirt and use it as a bounce source for the actor, etc.). I think there are so many ways to use the sun light, and I haven´t discovered them all, and haven´t tried them all. But it is an exciting topic and resource to experiment with. AND IT´S FREE. Great videos Aputure!!! So helpful!!!

  15. Lunascope Media on February 7, 2020 at 5:38 pm

    I like using trees in the background that when u move breaks up the sunlight and let’s beams of light through the leaves

  16. ProCopyAustralia1 on February 7, 2020 at 5:42 pm

    Would like to see a 2 person sit down interview, Bright as opposed to subdued lighting, but not too "edgey" We’re shooting some musician retrospective interview programmes

  17. Tyson Maughan on February 7, 2020 at 5:43 pm

    This video was more about white balance then how to shoot in sunny conditions. Kind of a let down.

  18. bokeh on February 7, 2020 at 5:44 pm

    Great video, thank u!

  19. Dissolve Music Official on February 7, 2020 at 5:44 pm

    Can the warmth etc be easily done In post? Thank you

  20. Andrew Ochoa on February 7, 2020 at 5:46 pm

    Saw Jurassic World in the thumbnail. I knew this video was gonna be very good 🙂

  21. Myron Davis on February 7, 2020 at 5:46 pm

    Great content as usual

  22. Trosky Long on February 7, 2020 at 5:48 pm

    Cinematic lighting outdoors at night

  23. TOUCH ENGAGE MEDIA on February 7, 2020 at 5:49 pm

    Ted, you nailed it. Bonus for working for a company… no clickbait fuss… just fact and application. This is a hidden gem for any intermediate filmmakers whom look to understand Kelvin and light motivation without the mystic balls. Pun intended.

  24. Written Mirror on February 7, 2020 at 5:52 pm

    Good stuff!

  25. jason H. Zeger on February 7, 2020 at 5:53 pm

    Terminator 2 has the most beautiful daylight iv ever seen.in general i find 90’s movies(specially 90-95)daylight sooo beautiful,warm and dreamy…movies like T2,Leon,desperado,Dances with wolves etc has most beautiful daylight.u can never see that kind of daylight in modern digital movies.its not orange nor Gray..its warm,soft and kinda Red…

  26. Cromwell Fluffington on February 7, 2020 at 5:54 pm

    He should up the font size on his teleprompter.

  27. cevrim on February 7, 2020 at 5:55 pm

    how do you know what anything looks like, you can barely open your eyes.

  28. markjflorentino_jp on February 7, 2020 at 5:55 pm

    Fro in the movie! Haha

  29. Man With a camera - Candid, Pre Wedding Shoot in Udaipur on February 7, 2020 at 5:56 pm

    Magnificent images

  30. Tyler Edwards on February 7, 2020 at 5:57 pm

    My favorite tip is to use a polarizer filter outdoors.

  31. Mkmed Khaled on February 7, 2020 at 5:59 pm

    check the weather forcast and choose the days that match for mutiple days shots

  32. BadKarma 714 on February 7, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    My favorit tip is using defusion to soften the daylight looks really good

  33. Jake Frew on February 7, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    My favorite tip for shooting in the daylight came from Matti Haapoja’s latest video on lighting, and that was to look for features in the surroundings that act as a reflector to bounce light onto the subject (and remove those harsh raccoon-eye shadows). So for example he found a large white electric box that bounced light onto the subject. Awesome tip for run-and-gun shooting!

  34. Dimi Vakrilov on February 7, 2020 at 6:02 pm

    My favorite tip for shooting in daylight is to use difusion and bounce to soften your image!

  35. Isaac Holyk on February 7, 2020 at 6:05 pm

    I want an Aputure light so bad. I would love to review one on my channel. I think I am going to get the 120D mk11=) I need something bright enough to work in the sun.

  36. trxmedia on February 7, 2020 at 6:06 pm

    Out of these four, I like to use the Hollywood daylight… Although I can see myself using the gray daylight in my upcoming short to symbolize a dark place in the character’s life.

  37. nicholas soh on February 7, 2020 at 6:07 pm

    Love the day light! however, can you dont use the black box to block the visual?

  38. motipic on February 7, 2020 at 6:07 pm

    Great video

  39. David Kashner on February 7, 2020 at 6:08 pm

    Very emotioal

  40. FRAME26 on February 7, 2020 at 6:11 pm

    My tip for shooting in daylight is………… USE ND FILTERS!!!! Now send me my light please. Lol

  41. AFP Entertainment on February 7, 2020 at 6:12 pm

    THANKS for this nice tips!! 😊

  42. Portrait Mood on February 7, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    i cant see your eyes

  43. Michael Coleman on February 7, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    Very helpful. I was aware that not all daylight looks the same, but I never really considered the implications the way you’ve outlined it here. Thanks.

  44. Larramenpa on February 7, 2020 at 6:16 pm

    You don’t use the word "low key" as it really means.

  45. jennyluvsfood on February 7, 2020 at 6:16 pm

    My tip: Look at how the light is hitting the talent and move around to see what is flattering …often i find the sun hitting the side and a bit of the back of head to be flattering …like in my ‘somebody’ music video

  46. Thomas Windfeld on February 7, 2020 at 6:16 pm

    Seriously! I love this channel!🤗

  47. Sagar Rao on February 7, 2020 at 6:17 pm

    EMOTIOAL 😛

  48. mark james on February 7, 2020 at 6:17 pm

    gray daylight… well there’s an easy one for us brits

  49. Hersi Abdirizak on February 7, 2020 at 6:18 pm

    Hollywood lighting

  50. MrVipitis on February 7, 2020 at 6:19 pm

    I find it hard to plan for daylight weather conditions. And often shadows give away a timejump when you don’t shoot on a single day of get everything chronological.

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