Fossil Hunting In the Gobi – Shelf Life 360

Fossil Hunting In the Gobi – Shelf Life 360

Join a 1920s fossil-hunting expedition to the Gobi Desert with Roy Chapman Andrews, then step into the Museum’s modern-day collections with paleontologist Mike Novacek to discover how these finds are studied today.

#fossils #GobiDesert #Mongolia #VR #360

Check out a quick primer on how to watch 360 video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXO5bnyBhzo

Go behind the scenes to see Gobi fossils researchers are working with today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTyNGtadjq0

For more discoveries in the desert, visit our episode website: http://www.amnh.org/amnh2/shelf-life/discoveries-in-the-desert

For Shelf Life’s Season 2, pack your bags for adventure. Explore fantastic stories from more than a century of expeditions that helped build the Museum’s 33 million specimens and artifacts—and find out what scientists are still uncovering about them today.

For more, visit our series website: http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife

Series Trailer

Episode 1: 33 Million Things

Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy

Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth

Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito

Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star

Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils

Episode 7: The Language Detectives

Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid

Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps

Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch

Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders

Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes

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This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum.

© American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

9 Comments

  1. JW Pev on March 13, 2020 at 3:25 pm

    The subject is good but the video is a waste.

  2. L Lxg on March 13, 2020 at 3:41 pm

    This is amazing ! Thank you !!

  3. jsfbr on March 13, 2020 at 3:47 pm

    FANTASTIC!!!!!!!! 😱😱😱

  4. jsfbr on March 13, 2020 at 3:50 pm

    I didn’t know YouTube provided this kind of experience until now!

  5. Peter Solomon on March 13, 2020 at 4:05 pm

    When Film-makers address Cultural History the result can be a revelation to viewers. That said, as someone who works in film and compositing, I personally find the work shown in the above clip aesthetically unattractive. To be specific, the elements jar because of poor clip stabilisation; irregular grading, mismatching of scale between still and motion sources, and distortion as a result of the source media, and the software employed. The combined effect of these elements works to distract my attention from the subject matter, rather than hold my attention.

  6. Marky Mark on March 13, 2020 at 4:14 pm

    Its a pitty they are never find them near to where people live so members of the public could have a look.

  7. BeThreeSixty on March 13, 2020 at 4:16 pm

    amazing work.

  8. Nathaniel Hamrick on March 13, 2020 at 4:20 pm

    Cool mr. novacek! great job folks, fun watch.

  9. Ben G Thomas on March 13, 2020 at 4:22 pm

    Incredible video!

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